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Zeming embraces world first solar technology

Admin | 2:25:00 PM |
TWO major islands Malai and Tuam of Tewae-Siassi district in Morobe Province will be the first in the country and world to use an osmosis water system.

This is a new state-of-the-art solar powered water project that will be constructed some metres deep in the sea with a high powered filtration system to turn salt water into fresh water for the island communities.

The project is a first of its kind and an initiative of the district funded through its sanitation program by local MP and Fisheries and Marine Resources Minister Mao Zeming.

The solar reverse osmosis water system project will be spearheaded by the United States of America Kube Technology starting next month following the high demand of the island population.

Kube is a full-service economic development company, with a wealth of project experience throughout Papua New Guinea, Australia, Asia, the United States and the Caribbean.

The firm specialises in technology development, project development, planning, financing, investment, marketing, project management and consultancy.

Kube Technology director and inventor Greg Cooper during a survey last Thursday said Kube Technology has been tasked to deliver water project but will also provide electricity, vaccine, refrigeration systems using solar power.

Mr Cooper said it has taken five years of testing and grateful to Mr Zeming for the opportunity to supply water and electricity to the people of Malai and Tuam Island.

"Rural island communities deserve life essentials such as water, electricity, and vaccine with access to cold food storage facilities and we will ensure the services are delivered" said Cooper.

Tewae-Siassi district project officer Mr Desmond Jack said K1 million has been funded by the district and thanks to Mr Zeming for his effective response to get the project underway.

"We are committed and will also look into establishing other similar osmosis solar water project for other atoll communities after our first pilot project is completed," Jack said. Post Courier